Employer Internship Manual

internship manual image

Internship Manual

I. Overview/Mission and Vision

Florida International University

Division of Student Affairs

Career Services Office

II. Resources for Employers

A. Before the Internship

What is an internship?

What are the benefits of an internship?

What types of internships are there?

How long does it take to create an internship program?

How do I create a successful internship program?

How do I recruit FIU Students?

Additional resources

B. During the Internship

Help students set personal goals

Create a learning agreement

Orientation process

Supervise the intern

Regular meetings with intern

Provide opportunities to network and build relationships

 C. After the Internship

How do I conclude the internship?

Evaluation

Hire an intern

Reporting internships to Florida International University

 D. Appendices

Appendix A- Internal Needs Assessment

Appendix B- Sample Learning Goals Agreement

Appendix C Sample Student Intern Information Form

Appendix D- Sample Internship Evaluation by Supervisor

Appendix E– Sample Internship Evaluation by Student

Appendix F – Career Services Internship Policies and Procedures

OVERVIEW


Florida International University

Vision:

Florida International University will be a leading urban public research university focused on student learning, innovation, and collaboration.

Mission:

Florida International University is an urban, multi-campus, public research university serving its students and the diverse population of South Florida. We are committed to high-quality teaching, state-of-the-art research and creative activity, and collaborative engagement with our local and global communities.

Our mission is to impart knowledge through excellent teaching, promote public service, discover new knowledge, solve problems through research, and foster creativity.

Division of Student Affairs

 


Vision:

The Division of Student Affairs at Florida International University will be known as a leader in promoting excellence and fostering student learning.

Mission:

The Division of Student Affairs at Florida International University supports the mission of the University by engaging students in becoming active contributors in an evolving global and technological society. The Division teaches civic responsibility, leadership, and commitment to service; nurtures an understanding of diversity; and contributes to academic success by providing students with support services and experiential learning opportunities.

Career Services

 


Vision:

FlU graduates are equipped with the tools and resources to develop and manage their careers within a global workforce.

Mission:

To provide FIU students, alumni, faculty, administration and the community with current information regarding career development skills, trends and issues while preparing a viable global workforce for the 21st century.

 

RESOURCES FOR EMPLOYERS


I. Before the Internship


What is an internship?
 An internship is a form of experiential learning that integrates knowledge and theory learned in the classroom with practical application and skills development in a professional setting. Internships give students the opportunity to gain valuable applied experience and make connections in professional fields they are considering for career paths; and give employers the opportunity to guide and evaluate talent (National Association of Colleges and Employers – NACE).

At FIU Career Services, we are available to assist you with developing a successful internship program.  Our staff can help create a positive internship experience for both you and our students.

What are the benefits of an internship?

Internships were rated by employers as one of the most effective recruiting methods for hiring new college graduates according to the National Association of Colleges and Employers (NACE). Bringing on an intern for a semester or a summer can offer a variety of benefits for both your business and the student.  It’s a great way for your team to get a new member with fresh ideas and perspectives since typically an intern is still in school or a recent graduate.  In addition, you and your more experienced employees can share your expertise while helping the intern to gain work experience.

  • NACE statistics:
    • 97% of employers plan to hire interns and co-op students in 2014
    • 88.9% of employers retained students hired from their internship programs for more than one year in 2013
    • 60% of 2012 college graduates who participated in an internship received at least one job offer.
    • 95% of employers are looking for college grads with experience.
    • Organizations converted 58.6% of their interns into full-time hires (highest recorded percentage)
    • 83.4% of employers say that their internship program is designed to help their organization recruit entry-level hires.
  • Recruiting a talented and diverse student body:

As Miami’s first and only four-year public research university, FIU is Worlds Ahead in its service to the community and is a great place to recruit interns. With a student body of over 50,000, we are one of the 10 largest public universities in the nation, with more than 115,500 FIU alumni currently living and working in South Florida.

Our colleges and schools offer more than 200 bachelors, masters and doctoral programs in fields such as Engineering, International Relations and Law.  As one of South Florida’s anchor institutions, FIU has been locally and globally engaged for more than four decades, finding solutions to some of the more challenging problems of our time.

FIU’s student body reflects the diversity of South Florida with 61% of our student body being Hispanic, 15% White Non-Hispanic, 13% Black, 4% Asian or Pacific Islander and 7% other minority groups.

  • Some tangible benefits include:
  1. Year-round source of highly motivated pre-professionals.
  2. Interns can assist with special events and/or short-term projects.
  3. Interns may offer fresh ideas and new perspectives.
  4. Mentoring an intern provides your staff members the opportunity to develop supervisory skills.
  5. An intern can be evaluated and trained for possible future employment.
  6. Providing internships can be a cost-effective solution for short-term projects.
  7. An employer’s visibility on campus is increased when promoting internships.  It is a great way to brand your company on campus!

 

What types of internships are there?

  • Credit/Non-Credit
    One option to explore is whether the student can receive academic credit for your internship experience. The student is responsible for contacting their academic department/advisor to determine whether the internship is eligible for credit.  This is a great advantage to students who are trying to find ways to fit an internship into their already busy schedule, and also helps to balance the fact that the internship/s you offer may be unpaid. The requirements vary according to their department, so make sure they gather this information before they accept an opportunity.
  • Paid/Unpaid
    Each internship experience is unique and many times the choice to pay or not to pay is determined by industry, company size and other factors.  Some organizations will offer to pay a salary as well as airfare and/or housing while others will provide a “one-time” stipend at the end of the experience.  The important thing to remember is that while an internship may not be paid, it is still one of, if not the best way for college students to gain real-world experience.
  • Full-time/Part-time
    There are a variety of internship options available to students, allowing them to cater their experience to their own schedule.  Part-time internships typically require students to be present between 15-25 hours a week.  Part-time internships tend to be advantageous for students who are already working a part-time job, or are enrolled as full-time students.  Employers understand that student interns have busy and non-traditional schedules, so they are very flexible in terms of making adjustments to internship schedules during the week of mid-terms, finals or vacations/holidays.
  • Length of Internship
    Typically, the length of an internship is one semester. However, the length of an internship can vary based on your needs, whether the internship is being offered on a for-credit or not-for credit basis, and/or the discipline. The important thing for you to remember when you begin thinking about recruiting an intern is that the search and application process for students should happen the semester before the semester they intend to start their internship. So, for example, if students are looking for summer internships, they are advised to begin that process during the spring semester.

For specific details, please contact the Career Services Office.

How long does it take to create an internship program?

Creating an internship program at your organization can range from several weeks to several months.  This is based on a number of factors, including:

  • The needs of the organization
  • The size of the organization
  • The number of interns needed
  • Whether the internship is for-credit or not-for credit
  • Whether the intern’s hours will count towards licensing requirements (for specific disciplines/degrees)

With a bit of pre-planning, the internship will be more successful for you and the intern.

Make the internship count for your agency and the intern by finding meaningful projects the intern can do.

How do I create a successful internship program?

Ideally, a successful internship program should meet the organization’s needs while providing students with relevant career experiences.  An internship is a supervised work experience in which a student has intentional learning goals and reflects actively on what is being learned throughout the experience.  Learning activities common to internships include learning objectives, observation, reflection, evaluation, and assessment.   A brief outline of some of the things you may wish to consider as you begin establishing your program is outlined below.

  • Determine organization needs and capacity

Researching the organization’s needs beforehand can save substantial time in making adjustments after you have already begun the internship program.  You should consider the following:

  • What department or work area would benefit from an intern’s assistance?
  • What kind of projects or tasks can you foresee interns undertaking?
  • What learning opportunities can your organization provide the student?
  • Who will be able to mentor the student providing evaluation of the student’s performance while bridging practical experience to what is being learned in the classroom?
  • What is the best time of year to hire interns?
  • How long should your internship last?
  • Do you have enough work space available to support the desired amount of interns?
  • What does your organization hope to achieve from an internship program?
  • What are the desired outcomes for your organization and the student?

See Appendix A for an Internal Needs Assessment Form

  • Obtain employee buy-In

The most successful internship programs are those that have obtained the buy-in of employees at all levels.  Interns are most successful when they are seen as a welcomed addition to the staff.

  • Research the students and FIU

Just as students are expected to research a company when they apply, employers should research the students and the university prior to recruiting at FIU.  Some key questions to ask:

  • What is this generation of college students like?
  • What are the preferred methods of communication?
  • What are common benefits and challenges of hiring college students?
  • What majors are available at FIU?
  • Set internship goals and create a position description

Employers are expected to provide work experiences that are both challenging and educational.  Setting internship goals and creating a position description will ensure that all parties involved are clear of the expectations for the intern.

When setting goals, ask yourself:

  • What will the intern be responsible for? Have a clear job description outlining the intern’s job duties.
  • Who will be the student’s supervisor?  This person should have the time, knowledge and positivity to mentor the student.
  • What qualifications are required of the intern? (e.g. Communication skills, computer skills, etc.)

Use the following as a guide of what to include in the job posting:

  • A proper internship title
  • A description of the organization and work environment
  • A clear description for the position, general responsibilities and learning objectives
  • The necessary knowledge, skills and abilities needed to be successful in the position
  • The minimum education and experience requirements
  • Duration of the internship, time requirements, compensation/incentive information
  • Identify internship supervisor/mentor

Depending on the size of the organization, you may have some flexibility in selecting a mentor and/or supervisor. The mentor will be there to answer questions and orient the intern, and should have a willingness to share. He/She should be someone who is willing to train or teach, as well as possess knowledge of the project and the organization.

The success of the internship is grounded in planning and having an on-site person to mentor and supervise them. The mentor may be the same person as the supervisor. The supervisor will manage the intern on a daily basis, and will monitor and evaluate the intern’s tasks and responsibilities.

  • Qualities of a mentor
    • Patience
    • Good interpersonal skills
    • Credibility
    •  Interest in being a role model for the intern
    • Knowledge of the project where the intern will work
    • Interest in helping the intern grow professionally
    • Interest in being a role model for the intern
    • Knowledge of the project where the intern will work
    • Interest in helping the intern grow professionally
  • Understand legalities and determine internship compensation

It is encouraged that all employers compensate interns through hourly wages, stipends and/or assistance with travel, parking, etc.  Compensation varies from industry to industry.  Keep in mind that paid interns make ideal workers who are hungry to learn, eager to make a good impression and willing to perform a multitude of tasks.  The relatively small amount of money employers spend on intern wages and benefits is a good investment because it often produces future, long-term employees.

Internship programs must meet the six requirements of the U.S. Department of Labor – Fair Labor Standards Act’s definition of an internship:

      1. The internship, even though it includes actual operation of the facilities of the employer, is similar to training which would be given in an educational environment;
      2. The internship experience is for the benefit of the intern;
      3. The intern does not displace regular employees, but works under close supervision of existing staff;
      4. The employer that provides the training derives no immediate advantage from the activities of the intern; and on occasion its operations may actually be impeded;
      5. The intern is not necessarily entitled to a job at the conclusion of the internship; and
      6. The employer and the intern understand that the intern is not entitled to wages for the time spent in the internship.

 

In addition to the U.S. Department of Labor’s guidelines, the Career Services Office also follows the standards established by the National Association of Colleges and Employers (NACE).  All of the following criteria must be met:

      1. The experience must be an extension of the classroom: a learning experience that provides for applying the knowledge gained in the classroom. It must not be simply to advance the operations of the employer or be the work that a regular employee would routinely perform.
      2. The skills or knowledge learned must be transferable to other employment settings.
      3. The experience has a defined beginning and end, and a job description with desired qualifications.
      4. There are clearly defined learning objectives/goals related to the professional goals of the student’s academic coursework.
      5. There is supervision by a professional with expertise and educational and/or professional background in the field of the experience.
      6. There is routine feedback by the experienced supervisor.
      7. There are resources, equipment, and facilities provided by the host employer that support learning objectives/goals.

 

How do I recruit FIU students?

Contact the Career Services Office at Florida International University to recruit.  Begin recruitment early (3 to 4 months before you need the intern) to insure you get plenty of good, qualified applicants. It is important to have a fully developed internship program prior to posting the position and commencing the recruitment process in order to optimize your efforts.  If you have any questions on best practices or would like to schedule a meeting to discuss the recruiting process in greater detail, please contact a staff member at the Career Services Office.  The CSO office at FIU can create an individualized recruitment plan to meet your specific needs.

Matt Tanner                                                                         Martha Rosa

Assistant Director of Internships                                   Assistant Director of Internships

305-348-2423                                                                       305-348-3420

Email: mrtanner@fiu.edu                                                       Email: mrosa@fiu.edu

        • Registering and posting internships with FIU Career Services –Most employer services are accessible through our online posting system, Panther Joblink (affiliated with the NACElink Network).  In order to post an internship, you must first register with Panther JobLink.  Please follow these steps to register:
        • Visit Panther JOBlink at https://fiu-csm.symplicity.com/ and click “employer”.
        • Click Create employer account with company information, services requested and contact information. Click submit.  Please note that account registration may take up to 48 hours for approval.
        • Once approved, you may log into your account with your username and password at https://fiu-csm.symplicity.com/
        • Log into Panther JOBlink.  Under “shortcuts” click on “Create FIU Job Posting”.  Complete position information, requirements, and application process. Click “submit”.
        • Once you have posted your internship online, it will be placed in a “holding bin” to be reviewed by a Career Services staff member.  Once approved, your job will be immediately available for our students to view.
        • Event participation
        • Career Fairs – Career Fair is an opportunity for you to showcase your organization to thousands of students and alumni during our Career Fairs.  FIU Career Services hosts four Career Fairs a year on the Modesto A. Madique and Biscayne Bay Campuses.
        • Internship Fair – This is a unique event to recruit interns at FIU.  Held in the Graham Center Ballrooms, employers can showcase their organization to students who are specifically seeking internship opportunities.
        • Special Events – There are a multitude of events that will enable you to meet and recruit student interns.  Some of these events include: Business Etiquette Lunch, Business Etiquette Dinner, Mega Career Week, Mega Internship Week, Career Bash and networking events.  These are just some of the ways that employers leave an imprint on the FIU community.
        • On-Campus recruiting services
        • On-Campus Interviewing – Host your first round of interviews at your Career Services Office in a private interviewing room.
        • Information Sessions/Meet and Greets – Market and present your opportunities to students and alumni while providing an in-depth and interactive look into your organization.
        • Practice Interview Program – The Practice Interview Program (PIP) provides our students an opportunity to practice their interviewing skills with recruiters.   This offers you a great opportunity to brand your company on campus as well as provide constructive feedback to our students, which will help them during their job search.
        • Resume Books – Based on your preselected criteria, Career Services is able to create a resume book of qualified candidates via Panther JOBlink.
        • Establishing campus partnerships (Academic and CSO)
        • Employer Spotlight– This opportunity is held every other week and is where the Career Services department highlights an employer before our staff meeting. We typically ask employers to come into the staff meeting from 9am until 10am and speak with our staff about their company and the type of students they are looking for, opportunities they have and the company culture. This is an informal way to get your companies name out on campus.
        • Getting involved with students/ student organizations –Career Services houses two student groups within our office.
          • Delta Epsilon Iota (DEI) is a career and academic honor society with over 1,000 active members.  Come and present for 30 minutes during one of their general meetings!
          • Executive Protégé Initiative (EPI) – Sponsor a brown bag lunch session or host a meet and greet with students.
          • Co-present workshops – Partner with Career Services during MEGA Career Week as they present workshops to students and alumni on career development topics such as resume writing, interviewing skills, internships, networking and how to succeed at Career Fair.  This is a great way to interact with students and begin branding your company on campus.
        • Recruiting international students
          • The most common types of visas employers will see on college campuses when recruiting international undergraduate or graduate students for either full-time or internship positions, are the F-1 and J-1 visas.
          • “An F-1 visa is granted to a person coming to the United States to attend a college, university, seminary, conservatory, academic high school, elementary school, or other academic institution or language training program approved by the U.S. Attorney General for study by foreign students. The visa holder plans to return home after completing studies. This is the most common non-immigrant visa for an international student attending undergraduate and graduate school. Students are granted F-1 status until the completion of the academic program and 12 months of post-program practical training. The purpose of the F-1 visa is to provide an opportunity for study in the United States. Anything outside of study, including employment, is an exception to the visa.”
          • Employers may need to seek legal advice regarding the hiring of international student interns from their organization’s legal team.
          • Also see the website of the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services.
        • Identification and selection of intern
          • Ethical and legal standards for hiring students –The Career Services Office does not place students in internships but provides resources for employers to identify and select quality FIU students and alumni. Please visit NACE Faculty Guide for further clarification.
            • FIU Career Services accords equal opportunity to all placement registrants without regard to race, color, national origin, religion, age, gender, disability, pregnancy, sexual orientation, gender identity, military status or veteran status.
            • Employers visiting FIU campus for on-campus recruiting are likewise expected to conform to Equal Employment Opportunity regulations and related legislation in their recruitment and hiring practices.
          • Screen applicants- Look at the candidate’s qualifications. Do they match your needs? Does the intern seem motivated to work with you? Will the intern fit with your organization’s culture? One difference you will notice in evaluating intern candidates is that candidates will not have the same level of work experience listed on their resumes. Students may instead list relevant coursework or academic projects they have completed, as well as skills or experience gained through extracurricular or community activities. With careful consideration, you will select an intern who best fits your agency.
          • Interview – Schedule telephone or personal interviews with the top candidates. You may wish to contact the Career Services Office at FIU to inquire about the option of interviewing students on campus. The interview process for intern candidates will be similar to that of potential new employees. One or more individuals from your organization may be involved with the interview process. Asking about these types of experiences in the interview will allow the intern candidate to make the connection to the internship for which he/she is applying and demonstrate why he/she would be a top candidate choice.
          • Make an offer –Define the start and end dates and compensation. There are legal issues to consider when hiring an intern. If considering an international student, you will want to know the legal issues involved. See Appendix G for more information on Legal Issues.

Additional Resources

a)      NACE 15  Best Practices for Internship Programs

b)      NACE Faculty Guide

c)      National, member organizations can offer excellent assistance. The following organizations, and their regional and/or statewide affiliates, should be consulted:

National Society for Experiential Education (NSEE)
19 Mantua Rd.
Mt. Royal, NJ 08096
Phone: 856-423 – 3427
Fax: 856-423-3420
Web: www.nsee.org

National Association of Colleges and Employers (NACE)
62 Highland Avenue
Bethlehem, PA 18017-9085
Phone: 800-544-5272
Fax: 610-868-0208
Web: www.naceweb.org

II. During the Internship


    • Help students set personal goals – Setting internship goals should be a collaborative process resulting in outcomes that meet the needs of the intern and the employer.  It is important to assist the student in clarifying what they will be expected to learn during the internship as well as skills they will be attaining.  Take time to establish learning objectives that will describe day-to-day activities and that will assist in meeting specific learning goals, while supporting the needs of the organization.  Remember, the internship experience should be an extension of what they are learning in the classroom.

      • Describe challenging, but realistic tasks or projects students can accomplish within a three-month period.
      • Work with you intern to establish specific learning objectives for students, as well as identifying outcomes or expected products.
      • Show how this work relates to the overall efforts of the department or organization.
    • Create a learning agreement

Setting internship goals should be a collaborative process resulting in outcomes that meet the needs of the intern and the site supervisor. Create a learning contract to clarify what you hope for your intern to learn as well as the skills you would like to develop in them.  Also, discuss potential learning goals with your intern and establish a working plan describing the day-to-day activities that will help your intern reach learning goals, while supporting the needs of the organization.

See Appendix B for Sample Learning Agreement

    • Orientation process – Becoming oriented with a new setting is often difficult and stressful when starting any new job. Therefore, the intern needs to become acclimated to the office environment in various ways.

      • Give the intern a tour of the office.
      • Introduce the intern to the other staff members.
      • Collaborate with the intern to develop a schedule, as they may have to work around class schedules or another job. The supervisor will discuss the schedule, meeting times for the intern and supervisor, as well as potential projects the intern may be working on.
      • The site-supervisor should tell the intern how and when feedback will be provided throughout the internship.
      • The intern should be provided with all material concerning pay schedules (if applicable), procedures for calling in sick, and overall expectations for attire and behavior.
      • Teach the intern how to use the technology in the office. (Do not assume that he/she knows how to use the copier, fax machine, email system, etc.)
      • The intern should be given a stable workspace and not be constantly moved around the office. Desk sharing between individuals on alternate days is often an acceptable practice for internships.
    • Supervise the intern – One person should be assigned to supervise/mentor the intern.  This person will act as a mentor to the student and not only have the time to dedicate to the intern’s development, but also the willingness and enthusiasm to guide and mentor them through this crucial experience.

      •  The supervisor/mentor should:
        • Communicate – Give the intern constructive feedback.
        • Be prepared – Have tasks ready. When an intern has success at one project, give another task that may use the same skills on a larger scale or adds a new skill.
        • Include the intern – Make the intern feel like they are a part of the group. Take the intern to meetings and/or lunches.
        • Be sensitive – Remember that being the new person or the least experienced person can be intimidating. Interns do not always possess the everyday knowledge experienced professionals take for granted such as office etiquette and appropriate dress.
        • Be interested – Listen to the intern’s ideas. The intern wants to contribute to the organization.
      • Regular meetings with intern – The supervisor/mentor should set regular meetings with the intern to go over the learning objectives, progress, and to address any issues or concerns.  These regularly scheduled meetings should be in addition to any informal feedback throughout the internship.   Students expect clear direction regarding expectations and frequent feedback concerning their work. In their academic environment, clear direction and periodic feedback is the way of life.

        • Meet regularly to provide feedback concerning his/her performance. During the meetings, the intern can do the following:
        • Report on the status of a project
        • Ask questions
        • Learn how his/her work is contributing to the organization
        • Participate in an evaluation of strengths and/or weaknesses
        • Discuss areas needing growth and development
        • Get a sense of what kind of work lies ahead
      • Provide opportunities to network and build relationships – It is important for the site-supervisor to provide opportunities for the intern to meet other staff members and key constituents of the organization.  Assist the intern in scheduling 15-20 minutes with these individuals to conduct informational interviews where the intern can learn about others’ roles and responsibilities in the office.  In addition, the intern should be included in meetings, luncheons, or other special events.

      III. After the Internship


      How Do I Conclude the Internship?

        • Evaluation

        • The intern – At the end of the internship, the employer should re-visit the learning agreement with the intern.  A formal evaluation is likely to be required, especially if the student is receiving academic credit. However, evaluation processes differ according to the academic discipline.  These evaluations will be helpful later if you decide to interview a former intern for full-time work or to help promote the success of your internship program.  Please see the sample evaluation form below.
        • Organization’s internship program – You may consider performing an exit interview in order to assess your organization’s internship program.  Intern feedback can be valuable to the success of future internship opportunities within your organization.  Students talk to students, so maintaining a positive image is a good predictor of future recruitment success.
        • Internship evaluation forms (Appendix D and E)
        • Hire an intern

      In today’s job market, internships have rapidly become an expectation for many entry level positions.  The payoff for students is invaluable.  It is also a great way for employers to screen and work with potential entry-level employees prior to making a full-time commitment. There is reduced turnover and training among entry level employees who were former interns.  Finally, hiring an FIU intern into a full-time position is an ideal situation for both the organization and the student. Everybody wins!

        • Reporting internships to Florida International University

      Once the intern has completed their internship, make sure to reach out to the Career Services Office to report your internship. FIU tracks internship experiences, which helps the University grow, and opens up future internship opportunities for the next generation of Panthers. Please help us in this pursuit!

      Appendix A:

      Internal Needs Assessment Form

      1. What are the ongoing projects that need additional assistance?

      2. What special or extra projects need to be developed or updated?

      3. What is the workload and how can we ease the workload of our department/organization?

      4. How many interns can we support?

      5. What will be the intern’s title?

      6. To whom will the intern report? (List name and title) If the intern will have a mentor different from   the supervisor, who will that be? (List name and title of mentor)

      7. Will the intern work in several different areas or departments or be assigned solely to one person?

      8. What will be the primary projects or responsibilities of the intern you select?

      9. What other activities will the intern do?

      10. Will there be daily tasks the intern will be assigned to do?

      11. How much general support work will the intern do?

      12. What are the desired skills and qualifications?

      13. Is there a specific major/minor that you require? Is there any specific coursework that is essential for doing the internship?

      14. What are the desired start and end dates? Are there desired times (semesters) when your agency needs an intern more? If so, what are they? Note: Interns usually are available for an entire semester (i.e., Fall, Spring, Winter break, or Summer)

      15. How many hours per week should the intern work?

      16. Are there specific hours or shifts required for your intern?

      17. Can you pay an intern or provide some type of monetary compensation? If so, how much?

      18. Where will you locate an intern?

      19. Is there any other information needed to consider an intern?


      Appendix B:

      Sample Learning Goals Agreement

       

      Learning Goals Agreement

      Setting internship goals should be a collaborative process resulting in outcomes that meet the needs of the intern and the site supervisor.  Use this guide to clarify what you hope to learn and the skills you would like to develop.  Also, discuss potential learning goals with your site supervisor and establish a working plan describing the day-to-day activities that will help you reach your learning goals, while supporting the needs of the organization.

            1. What do you hope to achieve by participating in this internship?
            2. What specific knowledge and skills would you like to gain from this internship?
            3. How will this internship relate to your academic experience?
            4. What criteria will you use to evaluate your progress at your internship?

      Intern’s Signature __________________________________                Date___________________

      Site Supervisor Signature __________________________________________________________________

      Date ___________________

       

      TIPS FOR DRAFTING A LEARNING GOALS AGREEMENT

       

      Your learning goals agreement outlines what you intend to learn and accomplish during your internship. It represents an agreement between you and your site supervisor built on mutual intentions and expectations for the internship, both educational and work-related. It also outlines specific strategies for achieving your goals and how your progress will be evaluated.

      LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

      Internship goals or learning objectives describe what you intend to learn through your internship. Be specific. Are you looking to improve or develop skills or expand knowledge of a particular field? Are you interested in testing a career interest, trying to decide what you want to major in, or in clarifying the direction of your remaining college years?

      STRATEGIES:

      Describe the specific process for how you will achieve your goals. Will you undergo training? How many hours? Will you be working on a specific project? Will you attend related conferences or meetings? Do you plan to interview professionals or experts about careers they have chosen? Have you thought about visiting another organization to get a better perspective? More than one strategy can be used to meet each objective.

      EVALUATION METHODS:

      Describe how your progress regarding each objective will be measured. How will you know and show others that you have achieved your learning objectives? Will you compile records of your activities throughout the internship (e.g., reports or other written materials you have prepared for the organization, notes on training sessions, staff meetings, or conferences)?  Will you ask your supervisor or other people at your internship site to observe you at work and give you feedback and suggestions?

      LEARNING GOALS  

      Learning Objectives

      (What I intend to learn)

       

       

      Strategies

      (Specific processes for achieving my objectives)

       

       

      Evaluation Methods

      (How my progress will be measured)

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       Appendix C:
      Sample Student Intern Information Form

       

      Student Information:

       

      Name__________________________________________ ID#__________________

      Phone_________________________________ Email__________________________________________

      Major(s)____________________________________Minor(s)___________________________

      Term: Fall___ Spring___ Summer___       Year: 20____

      Internship Site Information:

      Name of Organization__________________________________________________________________

      Address _____________________________________________________________________________

      Site Supervisor Name __________________________________________________________________

      Site Supervisor Job Title ________________________________________________________________

      Phone________________Email____________________Website_________________________

      Additional Details:

      Is this a paid internship? Yes ____ No____ If yes, please list compensation amount _________________

      How many hours per week will you work? __________________________________________________

      How did you hear about this internship? ____________________________________________________

      Brief Description of Duties and Responsibilities:

       

       

       

       

      Intern

      Signature _________________________________________              Date___________________

       

       

      Site Supervisor

      Signature _________________________________________              Date ___________________

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

      Appendix D:
      Sample Internship Evaluation by Supervisor

      The Career Services Office at FIU appreciates your willingness to participate in our Internship Program. Your feedback and support is greatly appreciated and will remain confidential. Please complete and return this form to the Career Services Office at your earliest convenience.

      General Information:

      Intern’s Name:_____________________________________________________________

      Supervisor’s Name:_________________________________________________________

      Supervisor’s Title:___________________________________________________________

      Agency/Organization Name:___________________________________________________

       

      Internship Information:

      Start date:                           End date:                                Hours per Week:

       

      Please select the column that best describes the intern’s performance during his/her internship:

      Excellent Very Good Average Below Average Comments
      Attendance Attends work regularly and on time
      Production Produces the expected volume of work
      Thoroughness and Accuracy Attentive to detail and gets the job done right
      Initiative Takes initiative on project assignments and offers effective solutions for improving operations
      Written Communication Writes with clarity and uses critical thinking skills
      Interpersonal Communication Articulates ideas and concerns clearly; maintains effective two-way communication with staff, peers, and supervisor

       

      In reviewing the intern’s Learning Goals proposal, do you believe that the intern has successfully achieved those goals?  Please explain.

       

       

       

       

       

       

      What suggestions would you offer the intern to enhance his/her career development and future job success?

       

       

       

       

      Appendix E:
      Sample Internship Evaluation by Student

      General Information:

      Intern’s Name:_____________________________________________________________

      Supervisor’s Name:_________________________________________________________

      Supervisor’s Title:___________________________________________________________

      Agency/Organization Name:___________________________________________________

      Internship Information:

      Start date:                           End date:                                Hours Per Week:

      Please rate the following statements:

        Strongly Agree Somewhat Agree Disagree Strongly Disagree Not Applicable
      I was encouraged to provide feedback and input          
      I was treated in a professional manner          
      Work assignments and tasks were challenging and stimulating          
      I was able to develop positive relationships and a network for future use          
      I gained skills and knowledge that will be helpful in the future          
      I was able to apply concepts I learned in class in the work environment          
      I believe I can get a good reference from someone in this organization          
      I feel better prepared to enter the work world as a result of my internship          

       

       

      Internship Evaluation by Student

       

      How has this internship helped you achieve your learning goals?

       

       

       

       

      Did the internship meet your expectations? Why or why not?

       

       

       

       

       

      Would you recommend this internship to another FIU student? Why or why not?

       

       

       

       

       

       

      Would you be willing to participate in a FIU internship student panel or other program for FIU students?

       

       

       

       

       

       

      Appendix F:

      Career Services Internship Policies and Procedures

      Employers who recruit interns with Florida international University must agree to follow the Career Services Office guidelines that include the following:

      • Register with PantherJOB link and provide a comprehensive job description of each internship position desired to be filled by an FIU student or alumni
      • Internship positions must provide clear learning outcomes,  internship objectives, and a defined start and end date
      • Employer supervision must be provided on-site and students must be provided with training and mentorship
      • Internships that are virtual, work from home, or require home site visits are not permissible
      • Full-time internship positions are required to provide compensation regardless of academic semester
      • Students will not be held financially responsible for training, materials, and/or other items required to perform job as required by the internship
      • Internship employers are responsible for the ethical and legal conduct of their employees throughout the internship experience
      • Re-disclosure of candidate information is strictly prohibited without the candidate’s written consent
      • Internship programs must meet the six requirements of the U.S. Department of Labor – Fair Labor Standards Act’s definition of an internship:
        1. The internship, even though it includes actual operation of the facilities of the employer, is similar to training which would be given in an educational environment;
        2. The internship experience is for the benefit of the intern;
        3. The intern does not displace regular employees, but works under close supervision of existing staff;
        4. The employer that provides the training derives no immediate advantage from the activities of the intern; and on occasion its operations may actually be impeded;
        5. The intern is not necessarily entitled to a job at the conclusion of the internship; and
        6. The employer and the intern understand that the intern is not entitled to wages for the time spent in the internship.
      • In addition to the U.S. Department of Labor’s guidelines, the Career Services Office also follows the standards established by the National Association of Colleges and Employers (NACE).  All  of the following criteria must be met:
        1. The experience must be an extension of the classroom: a learning experience that provides for applying the knowledge gained in the classroom. It must not be simply to advance the operations of the employer or be the work that a regular employee would routinely perform.
        2. The skills or knowledge learned must be transferable to other employment settings.
        3. The experience has a defined beginning and end, and a job description with desired qualifications.
        4. There are clearly defined learning objectives/goals related to the professional goals of the student’s academic coursework.
        5. There is supervision by a professional with expertise and educational and/or professional background in the field of the experience.
        6. There is routine feedback by the experienced supervisor.
        7. There are resources, equipment, and facilities provided by the host employer that support learning objectives/goals.

 

Manuals created by Ivette Duarte, Matthew Tanner, and Martha Rosa (Fall 2013)

For a downloadable PDF, click the Employer Internship Manual